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Spiritual Deception

Spiritual DecptionSpiritual DecpetionJesus said on the Mount of Olives (Matt. 24) that deception would be the primary cultural sign of the last days. Even some of God’s “elect” might be deceived by false theologies. “Good would be called evil and evil good” (Isaiah 5:20). Men would substitute light for darkness and darkness for light. Apostasy would consume churches and denominations that were once solid.

Using the guise of "discernment," some individuals have been using their platform in the apologetics community as a means to promulgate a brand of sad, critical Christianity. While predicated upon little more than an attempt to elevate their own narrow views concerning peripheral doctrines, these so-called "super discerners" operate with a grating, holier-than-thou brashness. Painting those who dare disagree on virtually any point as ignorant or foolish, these few "brothers" spare little in an effort to bully others into conformity. This "scorched earth" methodology is an evil, divisive plan that only Satan could concoct. And who has fallen into it? Apologists that should know better! And why? Perhaps pride and greed have blinded some to break fellowship.

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By Ray Yungen

Why are the mainstream denominations so open to meditative and holistic practices? A professor of theology at a United Methodist college gave this explanation:

A spiritual vacuum exists in organized religion that might be filled by theologies that draw—for better or worse—from what is called parapsychology, paranormal studies, psychic phenomena and, somewhat pejoratively, the "New Age" movement.1

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Hundreds of atheists have been drawn to Sunday Assembly gatherings as a way to meet likeminded people in a landscape dominated by faith.

LOS ANGELES — It looked like a typical Sunday morning at any mega-church. Hundreds packed in for more than an hour of rousing music, an inspirational sermon, a reading and some quiet reflection. The only thing missing was God.

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Saturday, 09 November 2013 07:53

Your Best Life Now: the Board Game

Published in 2006 and placed into the Museum of Idolatry in 2007, we find the artifact of "Your Best Life Now: The Board Game" still being sold on Amazon today. Apparently the Prosperity Gospel's attraction does not wane but only grows more attractive with age.

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Days later, George O. Wood, the general superintendent of the Assemblies of God, also visited BYU, followed by the Rev. R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of Southern Baptists’ flagship seminary.

Is there a new detente — perhaps more practical than theological — between evangelicals and Mormons?

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The mission of the Catalyst conference seems simple. So, why is Mayor Booker hoisted between speakers like Dave Ramsey and John Piper at a conference supposedly geared towards worshiping Jesus Christ, not catapulting Senate campaigns? There is an answer, but it is not so simple: Liberal Christians — despite how “apolitical” they claim to be — are feeding a repackaged version of evangelicalism to millennials for their own radical, yes political, agenda.

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“It is well and good for the preacher to base his sermon on the Bible, but he better get to something relevant pretty quickly, or we start mentally to check out.” That stunningly clear sentence reflects one of the most amazing, tragic, and lamentable characteristics of contemporary Christianity: an impatience with the Word of God.

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When someone believes social justice is more of a biblical priority than social issues, chances are their faith is based on the politics of man rather than the inspiration of God’s Word. Founded by Jim Wallis and Tony Campolo, Red Letter Christians are one such group of liberal progressives whose purpose is to counter the influences of the conservative Christian movement and traditional evangelicals.

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Mocked and derided across the cultural spectrum, the message of “health and wealth” enjoys wider support than one might imagine.

Prosperity-oriented teachers (including Roberts, the Bakkers, and Tilton) climbed to the top of the televangelist heap and suffered heavily during the "Pearlygate" scandals of the late '80s. But even from the ashes of scandal, the Prosperity message rose again and gained new momentum. Bowler notes two major changes that extended its longevity. First, the ascent of a smoother, more sophisticated "soft prosperity" message—touted by more relaxed, corporate figures like Joel Osteen, Joyce Meyer, and Paula White—replaced the more theologically-explicit "hard prosperity" teachings of an earlier generation.

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The following is an excerpt from the book, ERADICATE: BLOTTING OUT GOD IN AMERICA, chapter 13 – Counterfeit Christianity. Olive Tree carries this in our "store" online. Find it here.

Author, televangelist, and senior pastor of Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas, Joel Osteen seems like a very likeable and well-meaning Christian man. His ministry reaches about seven million people every week in countries around the world through radio and television. Prior to October 3, 1999, Osteen produced the church’s television program for seventeen years. With no biblical education or experience, Joel Osteen succeeded his father. Prior to his father’s death, Joel had only preached once in his entire life and had no theological training.

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